Notes


Matches 1 to 50 of 1,618

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1 "... was born at Maidenhead (original place name), New Jersey..." Phillips, Capt. John (I927)
 
2 "...a very short marriage." Family F1294
 
3 "...referred to as doctor, surgeon, apothecary, or physician in various records... was called into court on charges of fraud at least once, and called others into court frequently to collect for services rendered. His treatments ranged from simple salves to long term cures for 'grievous pains and troubles.' He was among just a few doctors operating in the area." Possibly received his training in an apprenticeship in England during the English Civil War. Maddox, Dr. Edward (I4388)
 
4 "A hopeful young gentleman & an experienced soldier" who immigrated to Massachusetts Bay in 1630 and settled in Charlestown.  Welden, Robert (I979)
 
5 "About four years after (Matthew's) death, his window, with her four living children, moved to West Tennessee and bought a farm in Fayette county, some twenty miles east of Memphis. There she died and is buried." Woodson, Paulina (I690)
 
6 "After the war was over, he settled on his farm in Goochland county where all his children were born. By industry, economy and good management, he became a man of wealth and leisure, and had an overseer to manage the slaves and look after the plantation." Woodson, John Stephen (I62)
 
7 "As stated in William and Mary Quarterly, her father, Robert Woodson of Henrico, made a deed in 1689 to 'daughter Sarah, wife of Edward Moseley.' This may have been a bridal present. The descendants of this couple have not been traced." Note: Edward's last name is Mosby, not Mosely. Woodson, Sarah (I606)
 
8 "At an early age he started in business for himself, and the self-reliance then cultivated, has, no doubt been instrumental in procuring him the prosperity which he now enjoys." Allison, Benjamin Alexander (I18)
 
9 "At an early age, possibly about the year 1656, Robert married Elizabeth Ferris, daughter of Richard Ferris of Curles."  Family F12
 
10 "Burke gives but one family of Tarleton in England; to which belonged Sir Banister Tarleton, the British Ranger during the revolution. They were seated at Lintwardine, County Hereford, and bore for arms, gules, a chevron; erminos between three cinquifolia, or; Crest; on a wreath between two ostrich feathers, arb, a mural crown, thereon a leopard's heat. Motto: Post Nublia Phoebus. There is no doubt that it was into this family that Sir Thomas Fleming married before emigrating to Virginia." Tarleton, Stephen (I601)
 
11 "Burke gives but one family of Tarleton in England; to which belonged Sir Banister Tarleton, the British Ranger during the revolution. They were seated at Lintwardine, County Hereford, and bore for arms, gules, a chevron; erminos between three cinquifolia, or; Crest; on a wreath between two ostrich feathers, arb, a mural crown, thereon a leopard's heat. Motto: Post Nublia Phoebus. There is no doubt that it was into this family that Sir Thomas Fleming married before emigrating to Virginia." Tarlington, Judith (I93)
 
12 "Dearest Husband, Remember the golden chain that binds our love together and if we should not meet again, Let's not forget each other. Mary" (hand-written note on the envelope that contained their marriage license.)  Berry, Mary Jane (I757)
 
13 "During the Revolutionary struggle, he held no military office, but served his country as chaplain of a regiment, which was regarded as an ecclesiastical office; and this is no doubt, the reason his name is not found among the "Officers of the Revolution." Woodson, Rev. Matthew (I73)
 
14 "Following the death of her husband she traveled to Texas to visit her sister, Mary Edith Allison Hayth & on to California to visit her twin brother, Dr. John Stephen Allison." Allison, Emma Jemima (I23)
 
15 "From the frequent intermarriages of members of the Payne family of Goochland county, with families resident in the Northern Neck (such marriages very seldom taking place in other Goochland families), it would seem very probable that George Payne came from that section of Virginia. It seems very likely that he was the 'brother George Payne' named in the wills of Richard Payne of Lancaster county, 1709; and of William Payne of Lancaster 1726. They were sons of William Payne and wife Susannah Merriman, daughter of Richard Merriman, Gent., of Lancaster." Payne, George (I513)
 
16 "Generally, John Wilkinson and Sarah Royal's children are thought to have been John Wilkinson... Joseph Wilkinson... Richard Wilkinson ... Ruth Wilkinson." Family F1527
 
17 "He died at half past 10 o'clock a.m. ... and was buried in the family burying ground." Woodson, Matthew (I64)
 
18 "He grew to be a man of splendid physical appearance and superior intelligence."  Woodson, George (I71)
 
19 "He takes great interest in religious matters and is prominent in church work." Allison, George W (I17)
 
20 "He was a minister of the gospel and as such rendered invaluable services to mankind within the scope of his influence." Woodson, Rev. Matthew (I73)
 
21 "He was a promoter and one of the first directors of the Columbia and Providence Plank Road Company, a road which connected the county seat of this county with the Missouri River." Woodson, Judge Warren (I72)
 
22 "He was a prosperous farmer and owned a number of slaves." Woodson, Matthew (I64)
 
23 "He was an active worker in the Columbia Baptist Church, a Whig and a strong sympathizer with the South in 1861-5." Woodson, Judge Warren (I72)
 
24 "He was an exceedingly popular man, a man of firm convictions and strong character. He held a high place in the hearts of his people until the close of his long and useful life." Woodson, Judge Warren (I72)
 
25 "He was curator [of the] Columbia Baptist Female College, afterwards known as Stephens College, and was the first secretary of its board." Woodson, Judge Warren (I72)
 
26 "He was one of the original subscribers to the fund that secured the location of the State University in Boone county, and actively assisted in raising the fund. He was one of the first curators of the Missouri University and was a member of the building committee that had in charge the erection of the main building in 1840 and 1841. He was president of the board for a number of years and served the University without any compensation, at a time when the institution was struggling for existence." Woodson, Judge Warren (I72)
 
27 "He was the 'first on record' from Germany to Pennsylvania. He settled in Bern Township, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania (now Berks County)." Fike, Christian Sr. (I382)
 
28 "He was too young to take any part in the Revolutionary struggle, being only about eight years old when that war began. so his title of captain was probably acquired in the militia service of the state, after the cessation of hostilities, when patriotic men had ample opportunities of rendering valuable services to their country." Woodson, Capt. Philip Sr. (I81)
 
29 "Her ancestors were eminent artists and composers. There were of French origin and in their religious faith were Huguenots. They came to Virginia about the time of the Huguenot exodus." LeSueur, Martha "Patsey" (I52)
 
30 "Historical Genealogy of the Woodsons" lists her birthday as April 3, 1908 but it's listed as April 23, 1908 on her headstone.  Allison, Faith Olive (I528)
 
31 "I knew them well and was at their house almost every day until I was ten years old. I was present when my great-grandmother died, in 1844. She was a woman of large size, weighing over two hundred pounds. My great-grandfather, Thomas Woodson, was six feet tall, very dark complexion, black hair and eyes, and weighed one hundred and fifteen pounds. In their religious faither, he and his family were Baptists; as were also his parents and their family."

Recollection of Mrs. Caroline Dupuy Bassett of Missouri, great-granddaughter of Thomas and Sarah Saunders Woodson. 
Saunders, Sarah (I686)
 
32 "I knew them well and was at their house almost every day until I was ten years old. I was present when my great-grandmother died, in 1844. She was a woman of large size, weighing over two hundred pounds. My great-grandfather, Thomas Woodson, was six feet tall, very dark complexion, black hair and eyes, and weighed one hundred and fifteen pounds. In their religious faither, he and his family were Baptists; as were also his parents and their family."

Recollection of Mrs. Caroline Dupuy Bassett of Missouri, great-granddaughter of Thomas and Sarah Saunders Woodson. 
Woodson, Thomas (I84)
 
33 "In 1686 Sarah Wilkinson was mentioned in the will of her mother, then Katherine Isham and she received clothes, woolens and linens." Royall, Sarah (I4122)
 
34 "In 1712, Judith Tarleton Woodson relinquished her dower right in land deeded by her husband John Woodson, merchant of the parish and county of Henrico." Tarlington, Judith (I93)
 
35 "In 1729, he made a deed to James Hambleton, for land in Henrico, being part of a tract granted to his father Robert Woodson in October 1704. As he was sixty-seven years old at the time of making this deed, he probably died within a few years thereafter."  Woodson, Richard (I603)
 
36 "In 1790 in Charles City County, Virginia, William Randolph was made guardian of Ruth and John Wilkinson, orphans of John Wilkinson. It was stated that John the orphan was about 14 or 15 years of age at that time. There may have been other children 21 years of age or older that did not have a guardianship appointed to them and no known record exists of their names, if any." Wilkinson, Ruth (I4124)
 
37 "In 1790 in Charles City County, Virginia, William Randolph was made guardian of Ruth and John Wilkinson, orphans of John Wilkinson. It was stated that John the orphan was about 14 or 15 years of age at that time. There may have been other children 21 years of age or older that did not have a guardianship appointed to them and no known record exists of their names, if any." Wilkinson, John (I4125)
 
38 "In the autumn of 1910 his portrait was presented to the county court of Boone county." Woodson, Judge Warren (I72)
 
39 "Irregular" marriage (no marriage bans read). Family F456
 
40 "It is not certain that Thomas Taylor's wife was Ann Cranston, as handed down in family stories -- no confirming document has been found (no birth record, marriage record, death record, will, or tombstone, and the children's birth records list the father's name only). She supposedly was related to the family of Lord William Cranstoun of nearby Crailing. She named a son Cranston, and her children used the name Cranston for their children, lending credance to the family stories. In Scotland at this time it was normal for married women to retain their maiden names, so the post-marriage records/tombstone, if she were listed, would include her maiden name. It is certain that she was not the daughter of the Ancrum Minister John Cranstoun; while it is true that this is the only Ann Cranston OPR birth record in Roxburghshire that would be the correct age (born 1725-1745), this Ann Cranston died unmarried in 1788 (documented by the Presbyterian church records (Fasti*) and her Ancrum tombstone**). I think it likely that the parents of the Ann Cranston who married Thomas Taylor were secessionists." Cranston, Ann (I1414)
 
41 "It is not positively known what public service he rendered to the colony but living as he did, at a time when every man had to bear his share of the public burden, it is confidently believed that, as a citizen and a member of the colony, he was faithful in his performance of his duty... In some publications he is frequently spoken of as Colonel Robert Woodson. If he held the military rank of colonel, it was of course by authority of the British government, as the entire colony was under British control at the time." Woodson, Col. Robert (I94)
 
42 "It is said that he was a great admirer of Gen'l Warren, and named one of his sons Warren, in honor of that gallant officer." Woodson, John Stephen (I62)
 
43 "John was buried on the home place at Selbysport, MD. The farm belonged to Nancy Guard and then Dorsey Guard. Dorsey Guard removed the headstones of John and Barbara and put them at the Mercy Chapel Cemetery."  Fike, John Sr (I380)
 
44 "John was buried on the home place at Selbysport, MD. The farm belonged to Nancy Guard and then Dorsey Guard. Dorsey Guard removed the headstones of John and Barbara and put them at the Mercy Chapel Cemetery."  Dellenbach, Barbara (I381)
 
45 "Long ago I learned about the sophistication of Boulderites when Aunt Vera and Uncle Whitney came to Grandmother's house back in Kansas in the 20s. There were so smart. Uncle Whitney taught engineering and was the designer of Folsom Field, the only football stadium I've seen where the team fights though the crowd to get back to the locker rooms at halftime. (I hear they've changed that now.)

Aunt Vera was a true Bohemian who unlatched her supporters the minute she came in the house. She would sit at the piano beating out the "Maple Leaf Rag" with rayon stockings sagging around her ankles while Quiz Kid Cousin Ruth delivered lectures about diesel locomotives for the other three-year-olds on the block."

Frances (Jensen Allison) Weaver's memories of her aunt, uncle and cousin, as written in her book, "As Far As I Can See..." 
Allison, Ruth Vera (I730)
 
46 "Long ago I learned about the sophistication of Boulderites when Aunt Vera and Uncle Whitney came to Grandmother's house back in Kansas in the 20s. There were so smart. Uncle Whitney taught engineering and was the designer of Folsom Field, the only football stadium I've seen where the team fights though the crowd to get back to the locker rooms at halftime. (I hear they've changed that now.)

Aunt Vera was a true Bohemian who unlatched her supporters the minute she came in the house. She would sit at the piano beating out the "Maple Leaf Rag" with rayon stockings sagging around her ankles while Quiz Kid Cousin Ruth delivered lectures about diesel locomotives for the other three-year-olds on the block."

Frances (Jensen Allison) Weaver's memories of her aunt, uncle and cousin, as written in her book, "As Far As I Can See..." 
Huntington, Whitney Clark (I739)
 
47 "Long ago I learned about the sophistication of Boulderites when Aunt Vera and Uncle Whitney came to Grandmother's house back in Kansas in the 20s. There were so smart. Uncle Whitney taught engineering and was the designer of Folsom Field, the only football stadium I've seen where the team fights though the crowd to get back to the locker rooms at halftime. (I hear they've changed that now.)

Aunt Vera was a true Bohemian who unlatched her supporters the minute she came in the house. She would sit at the piano beating out the "Maple Leaf Rag" with rayon stockings sagging around her ankles while Quiz Kid Cousin Ruth delivered lectures about diesel locomotives for the other three-year-olds on the block."

Frances (Jensen Allison) Weaver's memories of her aunt, uncle and cousin, as written in her book, "As Far As I Can See..." 
Huntington, Ruth (I1527)
 
48 "Mr. James Skinner of Bushnell, who has been at Wichita under medical treatment for some time, died on the morning of the 4th inst. and was brought to Bushnell for interment." Winfield Courier, Thursday, 13 Mar 1879. Skinner, James Allen (I378)
 
49 "She had a brother Mosby Woodson, who was a merchant in Richmond, and was never married." Woodson, Jane (I698)
 
50 "She had one sister and nine brothers; all of whom died without issue except Robert Saunders who was born April 22, 1778, and was married April 7, 1803, to Susannah Hord, of North Carolina, and died December 11, 1857" Saunders, Sarah (I686)
 

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